Linux如何在本地拷贝大量文件

folder_openLinux

 

 

-a, --archive
       This is equivalent to -rlptgoD. It is a quick way  of  saying  you  want  recursion  and  want  to
       preserve  almost  everything  (with -H being a notable omission).  The only exception to the above
       equivalence is when --files-from is specified, in which case -r is not implied.

       Note that -a does not preserve hardlinks, because finding multiply-linked files is expensive.  You
       must separately specify -H.
-h, --human-readable
       Output numbers in a more human-readable format.  This makes big numbers output using larger units,
       with  a  K,  M,  or  G  suffix.   If  this  option was specified once, these units are K (1000), M
       (1000*1000), and G (1000*1000*1000); if the option is repeated,  the  units  are  powers  of  1024
       instead of 1000.
-W, --whole-file
       With  this  option  rsync’s  delta-transfer algorithm is not used and the whole file is sent as-is
       instead.  The transfer may be faster if this option is used when the bandwidth between the  source
       and  destination  machines  is  higher  than  the bandwidth to disk (especially when the "disk" is
       actually a networked filesystem).  This is the default when both the source  and  destination  are
       specified as local paths, but only if no batch-writing option is in effect.
Local:  rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [DEST]

Access via remote shell:
  Pull: rsync [OPTION...] [[email protected]]HOST:SRC... [DEST]
  Push: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [[email protected]]HOST:DEST

Access via rsync daemon:
  Pull: rsync [OPTION...] [[email protected]]HOST::SRC... [DEST]
        rsync [OPTION...] rsync://[[email protected]]HOST[:PORT]/SRC... [DEST]
  Push: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [[email protected]]HOST::DEST
        rsync [OPTION...] SRC... rsync://[[email protected]]HOST[:PORT]/DEST
--info=FLAGS
  This option lets you have fine-grained control over the information output you want to see. An individual flag name may be followed by a level number, with 0 meaning to silence that output, 1 being the default output level, and higher numbers increasing the output of that flag (for those that support higher levels). Use --info=help to see all the available flag names, what they output, and what flag names are added for each increase in the verbose level. Some examples:

    rsync -a --info=progress2 src/ dest/
    rsync -avv --info=stats2,misc1,flist0 src/ dest/
  Note that --info=name's output is affected by the --out-format and --itemize-changes (-i) options. See those options for more information on what is output and when.

  This option was added to 3.1.0, so an older rsync on the server side might reject your attempts at fine-grained control (if one or more flags needed to be send to the server and the server was too old to understand them). See also the "max verbosity" caveat above when dealing with a daemon.

 

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